Common Writing Missteps (And How To Overcome Them)

by Dave Pasquantonio

Authors (and Loft board members) Erin Dionne and Anna Staniszewski know a lot about writing. They’re published authors—and they’re creative writing teachers. In their recent Loft craft chat, “What We’ve Learned from Teaching Writing,” Erin and Anna talked about how their writing has strengthened their teaching careers, and how their careers have strengthened their writing.

They also talked craft. They’ve seen a lot of good writing from their students—and they’ve also seen the same issues crop up time and again.

Here are some common writing missteps that Erin and Anna discussed during their presentation, along with some strategies for overcoming them. Continue reading

Nailing Your First Five Pages: How to Hook Your Readers

by Julie Reich

“Send a one-page query letter, a synopsis, and the first five pages of your manuscript.”

If this statement rings a bell, you’ve encountered the submission guidelines for many agents and editors. A lot is riding on the beginning of your novel. Done well, your first five pages could invite requests for more. But if you don’t hook your readers, they’re unlikely to give your book a chance. Continue reading

Meet A Lofter: Audrey Day-Williams

by Sandra Budiansky

It’s the return of our Meet a Lofter series, where we go deep into the lives of our fellow writers. This time we’re talking to the very funny picture book author Audrey Day-Williams. You will find Audrey at many Writers’ Loft workshops and classes.If you happen to see Audrey around the Loft, make sure you say hi! Continue reading

Mapping Out Your Writing Life

by Allison Pottern Hoch

It’s the beginning of the year and everything feels fresh and possible. Whether you’re still chipping away at a work-in-progress, starting something new, or staring down the lane at future publication dates, your writing life lies open before you.

But the wide-open possibility of an entire year doesn’t always jibe with reality—work, deadlines, kids, travel, housekeeping, health, pets. What has worked for me is mapping out a mix of fixed and flexible goals. This helps me have plan, self-motivate, and stay nimble as new opportunities present themselves. Continue reading

Full Speed Ahead—Write Faster, Write More!

by Dave Pasquantonio

Sometimes the words come easily—and sometimes they don’t. We writers know exactly what it feels like to want to write more, to want to write faster, but the muse is not cooperating.

But we can’t always blame the muse. There are actions we writers can take to make the words flow faster.

Anna Staniszewski led a recent craft chat at The Writers’ Loft, “Write Faster—Write More!” She gave the enthusiastic attendees exactly what they were looking for—methods and insights to help us get those words out. Continue reading

Where Do Ideas Come From?

by Sandra J. Budiansky

Is there anything better than coming up with a brilliant idea and then sitting down and writing a best seller? Probably not, but that doesn’t usually happen. Many writers struggle to come up with an interesting book topic. On October 11th, Charlesbridge editor Karen Boss presented the Writers’ Loft workshop Idea Development, and When To Let Go, and it led to a lively and inspiring conversation. Continue reading

Take a Peek Behind the Bookshelves; or Why Bookstores and Writers Need Each Other

by Allison Pottern Hoch

On September 10th, I’m moderating a panel of bookselling experts at the Writers’ Loft. I pitched this event to the Loft because, to me, the importance of bookstores and booksellers to the career of a writer is critical. Strong advocacy from bookstores can make a significant impact on the sales of a book. And writers can be relentless supports of local indies. At “Behind the Bookshelves: A Panel on Building Relationships with Bookstores” we’re going to talk about what working at a bookstore looks like, how writers and bookstores can support one another, and how their marketing efforts can work in concert. Continue reading