These Songs Tell A Story!

by Dave Pasquantonio

Writing flash fiction is a fun challenge. How do you tell a complete story in a few hundred words while layering in theme, emotion, and memorable characters?

If you need some inspiration, then break out your old vinyl records!

Classic rock from the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s is full of narrative songs—tracks with sharp characters, raw emotion, and unforgettable storylines. In this post, I examine one such song to see what we can learn from the lyrics. Continue reading

Common Writing Missteps (And How To Overcome Them)

by Dave Pasquantonio

Authors (and Loft board members) Erin Dionne and Anna Staniszewski know a lot about writing. They’re published authors—and they’re creative writing teachers. In their recent Loft craft chat, “What We’ve Learned from Teaching Writing,” Erin and Anna talked about how their writing has strengthened their teaching careers, and how their careers have strengthened their writing.

They also talked craft. They’ve seen a lot of good writing from their students—and they’ve also seen the same issues crop up time and again.

Here are some common writing missteps that Erin and Anna discussed during their presentation, along with some strategies for overcoming them. Continue reading

Nailing Your First Five Pages: How to Hook Your Readers

by Julie Reich

“Send a one-page query letter, a synopsis, and the first five pages of your manuscript.”

If this statement rings a bell, you’ve encountered the submission guidelines for many agents and editors. A lot is riding on the beginning of your novel. Done well, your first five pages could invite requests for more. But if you don’t hook your readers, they’re unlikely to give your book a chance. Continue reading

World-Building: A Minimalist Approach

By Angela Dell’Isola

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By a virtual show of hands: when I say “world-building,” how many of you immediately think of Tolkien? Or George R.R. Martin? J.K. Rowling?

The term tends to be heavily linked to fantasy and science fiction, because it often implies building something from scratch: producing maps; coining new words, phrases, or languages (back to you, Tolkien!); and constructing full-fledged structures for the governments, economies, and social frameworks of their alternate realities.

This is one approach to world-building, and it’s yielded some pretty fantastic (see what I did there?) results. But is it the only approach? I don’t think so, and it’s not exclusive to fantasy and science fiction. World-building can be an important tool across all shelves, and it doesn’t need to be a 20,000-league dive. Cue “minimalist world-building.” It sounds like a total oxymoron, I know. Continue reading

Those (Writing) Games We Play

by Heather Kelly, Founder, The Writers’ Loft

As writers, it can be hard to take ourselves seriously. We write during the in-between times—when the house is quiet because no one else is awake, before and after our day job, and in the car waiting for a child to finish their school day. It can feel like writing is an aside, the first thing to ditch when real life rears its ugly head.

Taking our writing—and ourselves—seriously is the most important step toward success.

But how?

By doing something that might seem counterintuitive.

We drive more effectively toward our goal, and take ourselves more seriously, when we treat our writing like it’s a game. Continue reading

Mapping Out Your Writing Life

by Allison Pottern Hoch

It’s the beginning of the year and everything feels fresh and possible. Whether you’re still chipping away at a work-in-progress, starting something new, or staring down the lane at future publication dates, your writing life lies open before you.

But the wide-open possibility of an entire year doesn’t always jibe with reality—work, deadlines, kids, travel, housekeeping, health, pets. What has worked for me is mapping out a mix of fixed and flexible goals. This helps me have plan, self-motivate, and stay nimble as new opportunities present themselves. Continue reading

Send Yourself A Letter

by Kelly Carey

(Note: a version of this article appeared previously on Kelly’s blog, 24 Carrot Writing).

Give your writing self the gift of encouragement.

This summer, I took a class at The Writers’ Loft taught by Charlesbridge editor Karen Boss. At the end of class, Karen asked us to write ourselves letters. The letters were an opportunity to chat about our writing hopes, dreams, and goals. Karen collected the letters and tucked them away. Five months later my letter appeared in my mailbox, and it was the most wonderful gift. Continue reading